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GINGER TEA

Ginger tea is tasty and delicious in its own right. It also combines really well with other flavours like citrus fruits, or salted caramel, or even blended with green tea. Check out our diverse and original array of ginger infused teas and find out more about one of the nation's favourite infusions.

HISTORIC ROOTS OF GINGER

Benefits of Vitamin C

Ginger root is a staple in most kitchens and easily recognisable, but did you know it’s actually indigenous to Southern China and has green leaves that grow to up to a metre long with yellow flowers?

Ginger has long been used since ancient times in cuisine and infusions across continents. The Ancient Romans first traded it in Europe in the 1st Century A.D. and it has long occupied a popular place in medicinal folklore, even back in medieval England where it was traded by Arabian merchants. In Victorian times a ginger grinder or shaker was placed on the dining table alongside the salt and pepper.

Ginger has long been known as a palate cleanser and digestive aid in the East from where it originally comes. Here in the West it’s a popular ingredient in cooking for its fiery kick. It works well for both sweet (think gingerbread man biscuits) and savoury hot recipes and, of course, many Asian dishes are regularly infused with ginger.

This wonderful root is still used today all over the world and grown commercially in Nigeria, Indonesia, Nepal, India and China.

SWEET & SPICY GINGER TEA

Ginger tea is one of our favourite teas. Although strictly speaking it’s called an “infusion” as it doesn’t contain any tea leaves. Ginger tea is both refreshing and uplifting, and relaxing and soothing all in one.

Lemon and Ginger is a sweet and spicy infusion and gives you that naturally warm glow of the familiar and comforting ginger smell and taste. Being an infusion, it is also completely caffeine-free and contains no more than 4 calories per cup. Ginger tea combines wonderfully with honey and other citrus infusions like lemon or lime, or fruits like rhubarb and other flavours such as chamomile. It is a delicious pick me up at any time of the day, and all year round. In the winter it’s a go-to re-vivifying warmer. But it can also be enjoyed as a summer infusion. It makes a delicious iced tea – or even an iced tea cocktail if you’re feeling fancy.

Find out more about our colourful range of infusions.

Benefits of Vitamin C

HOW TO MAKE GINGER TEA

Use one bag per person and simply pour on boiling water. Leave the infusion to steep for 2-3 minutes. Some people who prefer a stronger taste drink the infusion with the tea bag left in. Ginger tea can be sweetened with a little honey.

If you’re feeling a bit adventurous, you can also make ginger tea from the fresh root. Peel some ginger and chop into a few 1-inch pieces. Place the ginger in a teapot and pour over boiling water, leave to steep for 10-15 minutes.

Benefits of Vitamin C

FOOD PAIRING WITH GINGER INFUSIONS AND YUMMY RECIPES

Not only have we got a mouth-watering selection of different ginger teas for you, but we’ve also come up with some great ideas for food pairing with ginger tea as well as recipes prepared with infused ginger tea.

From informal get togethers to a perfectly arranged afternoon tea table or dinner party, you’ll find plenty of inspiration and food pairing ideas on our blog:

LEMON & GINGER TEA CAKE

For tea times this Lemon & Ginger Cake is unbeatable.

GINGERBREAD GREEN TEA FUDGE

A gloriously indulgent gingerbread fudge…

GINGERY BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP

This is a warming, hearty feel good soup. The sweetness of butternut squash and fiery ginger kick contrast each other perfectly. 

GINGER INSPIRED ICED TEAS

TWININGS GINGER FIZZ

A refreshing summer spritz? This is a wonderful gingery alternative to lemonade.

TROPICAL GINGER TEA MOCKTAIL

For those summery evening sundowners, our Tropical Ginger Green Tea Mocktail is a winner.

GINGERBREAD ICED GREEN TEA

Ginger galore goes summer - refreshing iced tea with a hint of citrus.

TWININGS GINGER INFUSIONS